Cyanotypes

The Cyanotype Process:

 

Cyanotype prints, introduced by Sir John Herschel in 1842, offer a brilliant blue image and a one-of-a-kind, hand-made piece of art.

Unlike photographs set in silver, like in black and white photography, cyanotypes are using a solution of iron compounds (Potassium ferricyanide and Ferric ammonium citrate). These two chemicals are mixed together in equal parts and coated onto paper or another absorbent material with a brush. The material then dries in the dark until it is time for exposure.

Objects or negatives are placed on top of the coated paper or other material, and UV light exposes the light-sensitive solution.Once the image has been properly exposed, the print is rinsed in water for several minutes, and dried. 

Sampson
Sampson

7" x 9" cyanotype

press to zoom
Michelle
Michelle

7" x 7" cyanotype.

press to zoom
Empty House
Empty House

6" x 8" cyanotype.

press to zoom

9" x 12" cyanotype.

press to zoom

9" x 12" cyanotype.

press to zoom

9" x 12" cyanotype.

press to zoom
press to zoom

8" x 8" cyanotype of original Shiva painting.

press to zoom
Alone
Alone

2 cyanotypes.

press to zoom
Resonant Magic
Resonant Magic

Cyanotype & screen print.

press to zoom

4" x 10" cyanotype of digital photography collage.

press to zoom

Cyanotype T-shirt.

press to zoom